News

Dr Paola Sakai, Dr Ben Rabb (both from iCASP) together with Helen Miller from Leeds City Council just recently produced a policy brief that aims to support Leeds City Council’s proposal to adopt the reduced 110 l/day water usage target that is consistent with the national (and other regional) policies. The iCASP researchers have been using…
CatchX global platform was officially launched last 11 February 2019 by the School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds and Earthwatch Europe. CatchX platform is a global web-based catchment hydrological information platform that allows scientists, water stewards and non-expert users to easily access and visualise hydrological information for river catchment level water management and stewardship. Designed by…
We are delighted to announce the launch of our EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Water and Waste Infrastructure Systems Engineered for Resilience (Water-WISER). Water-WISER offers a unique opportunity to the next generation of water focussed scientists and engineers to contribute to knowledge about sustainable water, sanitation, and waste management services towards improving infrastructure and…
Researchers from Leeds are partners in two pioneering international collaborations to develop new approaches to the global challenges of improving water security and urban disaster risk management. The projects are part of an ambitious new initiative established by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), as part of the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). The new scheme…
Marie Arnaud, PhD student at the School of Geography and 2017 SPRING competition winner, has developed EnRoot minirhizotron, an inexpensive, easy to build and partially 3D printable minirhizotron that offer a non-destructive alternative to quantify fine root production of mangroves which is considered amongst the most carbon-dense ecosystems in the world. Marie believes that a major…
According to Dr Alice Owen, “When planning major infrastructure projects in the UK, there is often an assertion that the difficulty of such projects is a modern phenomenon.   We grumble that great plans have to deal with many, often conflicting, constraints and considerations and it was all so much easier in the great era of…
water@leeds recently held a successful Confluence 2018 last 27th September at the Edward Boyle meeting room. Addressing the event, water@leeds Directors Professor Joe Holden and Professor Martin Tillotson presented the achievements of the group and highlighted the four main missions of water@leeds. This was then followed by an introduction from the new Associate Directors (Dr…
water@leeds members Dr. Julie Peacock and Dr. Karen Bacon recently published an article in PeerJ showing how the trees of stately homes such as the Harewood House could provide value in terms of carbon storage, runoff prevention, and pollution removal along with additional benefits to biodiversity and human health. According to the authors, previous research has shown the economic…
As part of the Usumacinta Roc Project, Dr. Julia Martin-Ortega and colleagues from ECOSUR and Scotland Rural College tested an innovative participatory research method. Using Theatre Forum, they presented some of the results of the project, which focus on understanding the risks that using an ecosystem services framing of environmental problems might bring in terms…
A projected consequence of climate change is the increase of farmland and crop production in 1200 areas that will expand northward to eventually cover an average of three-quarters of the boreal regions by 2099. These well-known agricultural lands include large sections of Canada, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia and the United States. This was from a study led by…